Archive for Cookies

Ireland biscuits with Baileys buttercream

Posted in Baking, Biscuits, Events, Recipes with tags , , , , , on 12/03/2012 by libbyplummer

Ireland biscuits with Baileys buttercreamI’m not Irish. Not even remotely. But that’s no reason not to make some garish green-tinted biscuits (or cookies, if you insist) in celebration of St Patrick’s Day on 17 March, especially when there’s Bailey’s buttercream involved (last year I made whoopie pies with bright green filling).

I was given a cookie cutter set shaped like the British Isles for Christimas (thanks mum!), hence I have a cutter shaped liked the Emerald Isle. If you haven’t got one, you can just make your own template from grease-proof paper and cut around it with a knife.

Apologies for stating the bleedin’ obvious, but thanks to the Baileys, these biccies contain booze so may not be suitable for the nippers.

Ireland biscuits with Baileys buttercream 2

Makes 16-20 biscuits (8-10 when sandwiched together)

What you’ll need:

For the biscuits:
90g/3oz unsalted butter
100g/3.5oz caster sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
200g/70z plain flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon fine salt
Green paste food colouring

For the buttercream filling:
225g/8oz icing (confectioner’s) sugar (sieved)
100g/3.5oz softened unsalted butter
1tbsp Bailey’s Irish Cream

What to do:
First, cream the butter and sugar together in a large bowl, using a fork. Next, beat in the egg and vanilla extract.  In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder and salt and then add to the original mixture. Stir together until it’s all combined. Lastly, add some green colouring, a tiny bit at a time, until you’ve got the colour you want. Once all mixed in, roll the dough into a ball, squash into a flat disc and wrap in clingfilm. If the dough feels a bit too sticky, then add a touch of flour. Leave the dough to chill in the fridge for about an hour.

Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees C/160 degrees C (fan oven)/gas mark 4. Roll out the dough between two large sheets of greaseproof paper. This avoids you having to add any more flour to stop it sticking, which can make the dough too dry. Cut out your shapes and place onto a lined baking sheet (make sure they’re well spaced, or they’ll fuse together in the oven when the dough expands). If you’re using an asymmetric shape (such as the outline of Ireland), then you’ll want to flip half of the biscuits over as you’ll be sandwiching two together to form a sandwich.

Bake for about 10-12 minutes or until the biscuits are slightly golden around the edges and slightly soft in the middle (they’ll firm up while they cool). Once out of the oven, transfer them to a wire cooling rack and after they’re fully cooled down then you can make a start on the filling.

Ireland biscuits with Baileys buttercream

For the buttercream, sieve the icing sugar into a large bowl and cream in the butter using a fork. Once it’s all combined and smooth, add the Baileys and mix in. Pop into an icing bag and pipe a blog into the centre of half your biscuits (on the flat underside), then sandwich together with the remaining half (with the flat side touching the buttercream).

Finally, sit back with your ‘Oirish’ snacks, and listen to some suitably Celtic rock, like this ditty from the Dropkick Murphys. They’re not from Ireland – they’re from Massachusetts, but don’t let that stop you. It’s a good tune…

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London Baking: best of 2011

Posted in Baking, Biscuits, Cakes, Recipes, Seasonal food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 31/12/2011 by libbyplummer

End of year blog posts tend to be lazy and self-serving and in keeping with tradition, this one is no exception. It’s basically a hastily constructed round-up of my favourite London Baking blog posts from 2011, with some nice piccies along the way. A fitting tribute to the last year or simply a piece of cakey propaganda? It’s up to you.

If you’ve made it this far, thanks for reading! Let’s do it all again next year.

Irn Bru cupcakes for Burns Night:

Irn Bru cupcake

Rock ‘n’ Roll Party Rings:

Rock 'n' Roll Party Rings

Cakes for Japan raises £2,000:

Cakes for Japan cakes

Anarchy in the UK cupcakes for the Royal Wedding:

Royal wedding cupcakes

London Baking Batterberg cake:

London Baking Battenberg

Han Solo in Carbonite chocolates:

Han Solo in carbonite chocolate

Kendo Nagasaki cake pops:

Kendo Nagasaki cake pops

Peanut butter plectrum biscuits:

Smashing Pumpkin cupcakes:

Smashing pumpkin cupcakes

‘Razor Blades in Candy’ red velvet cake:

Razor blades in candy red velvet cake

Syrian Victoria sponge cake:

Syrian Victoria sponge

Star Wars Holiday Special chocolate and brandy buttercream cupcakes:

Star Wars Holiday Special cupcakes

Happy new year!

3D Christmas tree gingerbread biscuits

Posted in Baking, Biscuits, Recipes, Seasonal food with tags , , , , , , , , on 18/12/2011 by libbyplummer

3D Christmas tree gingerbread biscuitsTime for more festive baking, this time in the form of a 3D Christmas tree made from star-shaped gingerbread biscuits. I used a set of 3D Christmas cookie cutters that  my dear old mum picked up for me from Lakeland, but you can always make your own templates or go freestyle if you’ve got a steady hand. After a week of Christmas booze-ups, my hands were anything but steady during the making of this intricate biscuit-based structure so I stuck to using the cutters.

Tenuous Youtube link ahoy! Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree…

What you’ll need:
350g/12oz plain flour (sieved)
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tsp ground ginger
100g/4oz butter (softened)
175g/6oz light brown sugar
1 large egg
4 tbsp golden syrup

For the icing:
200g/7oz icing/confectioner’s sugar (sieved)
some not-quite-boiling water
edible glitter/sprinkles  etc for decoration

Please note: You’ll need two of each star shape. I didn’t use the largest three cutters from the set, but if you want enough dough for those as well, then double the quantities given above.

3D Christmas tree gingerbread biscuits

What to do:

Mix the flour, bicarb and ginger together in a large mixing bowl. Chuck in the butter and rub the mixture between your fingertips until it looks like fine breadcrumbs, then add the sugar and mix until combined. In a separate bowl, beat together the egg and golden syrup then pour onto the flour mixture and use your hands to form it into a dough. Divide the dough into two large blobs and flatten into discs. Wrap them in clingfilm and bung in the fridge for at least an hour.

Preheat the oven to 190°/170° (fan oven)/375°F/gas mark 5. Roll out the dough between two sheets of baking parchment to prevent it from sticking. Roll out to a thickness of about 4mm and cut out your shapes. You’ll need two of each size star. Place on a lined baking sheet and stick in the oven for 12 minutes until the biscuits begin to turn golden brown at the edges. Leave to cool on the baking tray for about five minutes before transferring to a wire rack.

3D Christmas tree gingerbread biscuits

When the biscuits are completely cool you can have a crack at the decoration. Obviously you can add whatever icing and decorations you like, but here’s what I did:

Using a fork, mix together the icing sugar with 2 tbsp of not-quite-boiling water from the kettle. Add a little more water if the icing is too thick. Spread the icing on over the smallest two stars and cover one with edible glitter and the other with festive hundreds and thousands (on nonpareils). Take each biscuit and spread a small amount of icing to the tips of the star. After icing each biscuit, sprinkle the hundreds and thousands on before the icing sets. Leave to dry for an hour or so.

Finally, it’s time to construct your tree. Place one of the largest two biscuits on whatever you intend to serve the tree on (it’s a bugger to move once it’s all put together). Add a tiny bit of leftover icing to the centre and put the second biscuit on top, turning the star so that the points create the effect of branches. Build up the rest of the tree in the same way, using the small star with the hundreds and thousands on top. Lastly, secure the glittery star on the top using a good dollop of icing.

Lomography cookie cutters

Posted in Baking, Biscuits, Kitchen gadgets with tags , , , , , on 10/12/2011 by libbyplummer

Lomography cookie cuttersI like biscuits and I like cameras so I was embarrassingly excited to find out that analogue photography specialist Lomography has produced a range of camera-shaped cookie cutters. The nice people at Lomo are giving away a cookie cutter with every online purchase – if you spend £120 (or USD or EUR) you get one free cutter, spend over that amount and you’ll bag yourself the entire set of eight for free.

What’s more, the Lomo chaps are running a Holiday cookie cutter competition, where you can submit your analogue cookie photos in the hope on winning some great prizes including cook books and Piggy Points to spend in the online store.

Chocolate biscuits for Halloween

Posted in Baking, Biscuits, Recipes, Seasonal food with tags , , , , , , , on 16/10/2011 by libbyplummer

Halloween chocolate biscuitsApparently it’s Chocolate Week, so what better time to knock up some seasonal Halloween chocolate biscuits (or cookies, if you insist). I first made these last year, adapting a recipe from the Nigella Christmas book. They”re very easy to make and like many of the best recipes for chocolate cakes and biscuits, they, er,  don’t actually use any chocolate, instead sticking to the winning combo of cocoa and sugar (trust me, it’s much better). Don’t believe me? Try them for yourself…

What you’ll need:
125g unsalted butter (softened)
75g caster sugar
20g cocoa powder (sieved)
150g plain flour (sieved)
1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
1/2 tsp baking powder

For the topping:
1 tbsp (15ml) cocoa powder
90g icing sugar
30ml boiling water
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Seasonal  sprinkles

Makes 12 biscuits

Halloween chocolate biscuits 2

What to do:

Preheat the oven to 170°C/150°C (fan oven)/325°F/gas mark 3. Line a baking sheet with parchment or a Teflon baking sheet.

Cream the butter and sugar together in a large mixing bowl, using a fork. Once mixed in, cream in the cocoa, then add the flour, bicarb and baking powder and mix until it’s all combined.

Scoop up a blob of the mixture in your hand and roll into a ball (around the same size as a walnut). Place each ball onto the baking sheet and flatten slightly using your hand. Make sure they’re well spaced apart otherwise they’ll fuse together in the oven.

Bake for 15 minutes then remove from the oven and leave to cool on the baking tray for about 20 minutes before transferring to a wire cooling rack. The biscuits will look and feel soft when they come out of the oven, but they’ll crisp up as they cool.

Halloween chocolate biscuits 3

Once they’re completely cool, you can crack on with the topping. Chuck the cocoa powder, icing sugar, water and vanilla extract into a small saucepan and stir oven a low heat until combined into a shiny mixture. Remove from the heat and leave to cool for a few minutes. Next, drop a tablespoon of the topping onto the centre of each biscuit and let it dribble down the sides. Use the back of the spoon to even it out a bit if need be. Swiftly add your sprinkles before the topping dries and leave to set and you’re all done. I got my sprinkles from Target on a trip to the US, but you should be able to find them online on various sites including Amazon.

The perfect snack for grazing on while watching a horror film. Today’s choice – The Orphanage:

The Orphanage

Peanut butter plectrum biscuits

Posted in Baking, Biscuits, Recipes with tags , , , , , , , , on 22/08/2011 by libbyplummer

Inspired by a guitar plectrum-shaped cake that my mum made many years ago for my brother’s birthday, I decided to knock up some plectrum biscuits (that’s cookies to you, American cousins). In a nod to Elvis, who died last week in 1977, I flavoured my biccies with peanut butter, famously one of his favourite snacks.

Fender plectrums

I recently procured the Biscuiteers Book of Biscuits, which I used as a basis for this recipe. It’s the first time I’ve used the professional method of separate line and flooding icing, hence the slightly wobbly results. The recipe is a bit long-winded, but it’s all worth it in the end. Here’s what to do…

What you’ll need:

250g plain flour (sieved)
100g soft brown sugar
1/2 tsp baking powder
65g salted butter (softened and diced)
65g golden syrup
1 egg
1-2 tbsp milk
65g peanut butter

For the icing:
180ml cold water
1kg royal icing sugar/mix
Whatever colours you choose (in this case, yellow, blue and black gel colours)

Plectrum biscuit and plectrum

What to do:

Mix the flour, sugar and baking powder together in a large mixing bowl. Add the butter and crumble into the mixture using your fingertips until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. In another bowl, lightly whisk together the egg, syrup, one tbsp of milk and the peanut butter. Tip the liquid mixture into the dry ingredients and mix together until you get a soft dough. Add a dash more milk if it feels too dry. Divide the dough in half and mould each into a flat disc before wrapping in clingfilm and popping in the fridge for at least an hour.

Plectrums

Once chilled, unwrap the dough and place between two sheets of parchment before rolling out to 5mm thickness. Keeping the paper on, put the dough back in the fridge for about 20 minutes (on a baking tray or chopping board). While the dough is in the fridge, pre-heat the oven to 170°C (150°C fan oven)/350°F/gas mark 4. After chilling again, you’re ready to cut out your shapes, either using ready-made cutters or your own templates. To make your own, just draw or trace your design onto a piece of parchment and then stick this a spare piece of card and cut out. You can then bung this on top of you rolled-out dough and cut round it using a sharp knife. Place the shapes on a lined baking tray, leaving plenty of room between each biscuit. Cook for 14 minutes or so (you may need more time, depending on your oven). The biscuits are ready when they start to turn golden brown around the edges. Once out of the oven, transfer to a wire rack and make sure that they’re completely cool before icing, or it won’t stick.

Plectrum biscuits

For the icing:
Chuck the water in a large bowl, then add 900g of the royal icing sugar and whisk together until the icing is roughly the same consistency as toothpaste. You might need to add more icing sugar if it’s not thick enough. For this recipe, you’ll need to save three small bowls of icing at this stage – two for making the outlines and one of the Fender writing. Colour one blue, one yellow and one black, by adding tiny amounts of colouring at a time and mixing in with a fork until you get the colour you want. Take the first outline colour, bung in a disposable icing bag and snip the end to make a small hole. Pipe the outline of a plectrum around the edges of half of your biscuits, making sure that you join the ends up to create a tiny wall of icing. Do the same with the blue icing. Next divide the remaining icing from your original bowl into two parts. This will be your flooding icing, so you need to colour each bowl to match the yellow and blue outline icing. Once done, spoon carefully into the middle of each biscuit and smooth out to the edges using a cocktail stick. Leave to dry.

Colour the third tiny bowl (that you saved earlier) with black colouring, pop into an icing bag and snip of a small section at the end. You might want to practice writing the Fender logo in a piece of parchment before you have a crack at icing your biscuits.

Finally, return your biscuits to a baking tray and place in very cool oven – about 50-70°C/120-160°F/gas mark1/2-3. This may sound like utter madness, but it actually helps to restore the biscuits’ crunch, which can be softed by the moisture in the icing.

You might also like these Elvis peanut butter chip biscuits that I made earlier this year.

Bake-off at The Boogaloo

Posted in Baking, Biscuits, Cakes, Events, Out and about with tags , , , , , , , on 07/08/2011 by libbyplummer

Bake-off at The BoogalooAfter a successful launch in July, Holly and Poppy Presents will be holding a second bake-off at  The Boogaloo in North London. The event will take place on Sunday 14 August and the crew are looking for new stall holders as well as keen bakers to enter the bake-off. Here’s the winner of the last bake-off – Dion Gray with her red velvet cake:

Bake-off at The Boogaloo July winner

For more information, contact holly@hollychaves.com or check out the Facebook event page.

Bake-off at The Boogaloo flyer

Via: Holly and Poppy presents