Archive for Matcha

Kendo Nagasaki biscuits for Sugar Slam III

Posted in Baking, Biscuits, Events, Recipes with tags , , , , , , , on 13/08/2012 by libbyplummer

Kendo Nagasaki bicsuits
Last year I entered Bake & Destroy’s wrestling-themed Sugar Slam bake-off with the world’s first Kendo Nagasaki cake pops. This year? Kendo Nagasaki matcha biscuits.

I’m referring to the British name for ‘cookies’ of course, not the rolls that our American cousins serve with gravy. You can call them cookies if you like.

As someone who grew up with the British wrestling of the 1980s rather than the more flamboyant fighters from the US, the only distinguishable characters that stand out in my mind are Big Daddy, Giant Haystacks and Kendo Nagasaki.

Kendo Nagasaki

The latter (not to be confused with an American wrestler of the same name) rarely took off his mask, but one memorable bout saw him not only being stripped of his striped camouflage by his component, but also ‘hypnotising’ the offender with an intent stare and a wave of his hands.

Entranced as we were at our young age, my brother and I still were still not entirely convinced by his magical powers.

Sadly, ITV cancelled its wrestling coverage not long after that, quite possibly as a direct result of it.

Kendo Nagasaki

Despite his Japanese-inspired moniker and his Eastern mysticism, Kendo Nagasaki was in fact an English chap from the West Midlands called Peter Thornley. Which, in a roundabout way, brings me back to baking.

This year, my entry for Sugar Slam is again inspired by the masked wrestler, with the quintessential English-ness of the plain biscuit representing Thornley and the matcha green tea flavour standing in for his mystical Japanese alter ego. I cannot believe I just wrote that sentence.

Recipe? I thought you’d never ask…

Update: Voting for the Sugar Slam III People’s Choice Award is now open – if you like my biscuits, please head over to the gallery and leave a comment. Voting closes on 27 August at 9pm CST!

What you’ll need:
350g/12oz plain flour (sieved)
100g/3.5oz self raising flour (sieved)
125g/4.5oz granulated sugar
125g/4.5oz salted butter (softened)
125g/4.5oz golden syrup
1 large egg
4 tbsp matcha green powder

For the icing:
150ml/quarter pint cold water
900g royal icing sugar (sieved)
Paste icing colourings

Kendo Nagasaki

What to do:

Mix the flours and sugar together in a large mixing bowl. Add the butter and use your fingertips to blend it together with the dry mix until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. Once mixed in, add the egg and syrup and mix together (at first with a wooden spoon, and then with your dainty hands) until a ball of dough is formed.

Divide the dough in half and mould each into a flat disc before wrapping in clingfilm and bunging  in the fridge for at least an hour.

Preheat the oven to 170°C (150°C fan oven)/350°F/gas mark 4. Once chilled, unwrap the dough and pop it between two sheets of baking parchment and roll out to about 5mm thickness. Cut our your chosen shapes either using ready-made cutters or your own templates.

To make your own, just draw or trace your design onto a piece of parchment and then stick this a spare piece of card and cut out. Stick the shapes on a lined baking tray, leaving plenty of room between each biscuit. Cook for 14 minutes or so (you may need more time, depending on your oven).

The biccies are ready when they start to turn golden brown around the edges, at which point you need to take them out of the oven and transfer to a wire rack. Don’t even think about icing them before they’re completely cool otherwise the icing just won’t stick.

Kendo Nagasaki matcha biscuits

For the icing:
Stick the water in a bowl and then using a fork to mix the icing sugar in. Once mixed together, you need to siphon off separate bowls for as many different colours as you’re planning to use. I saved a small bowl of white mixture for the stripes, plus a small amount to colour grey for the facial features and a small amount to colour red for the outlines.

Take the outline colour ( in this case red) and pop into a disposable icing bag and snip the end to make a small hole. Pipe the outline around the edges of your biscuits, making sure that you join the ends up to create a tiny wall of icing.

The remaining icing in the original bowl will be your flooding icing, which will need to be coloured to match the outline. Once done, spoon carefully into the middle of each biscuit and smooth out to the edges using a cocktail stick. Leave to dry.

Using the same process as you used for the outline, you can use the remaining colours to pipe on the rest of the details. And then you’re done.

Recipe adapted from Biscuiteers Book of Iced Biscuits